Best Practice for Anti Virus on SQL Server

Best Practice for Anti Virus on SQL ServerIn this post, let’s take a look at Best Practice for Anti Virus on SQL Server. Before we jump into the terms, let’s talk about some general thing to get the idea. Security!! It is the utmost priority when it comes to deal with data.It is super important. There are many areas that one will look for and tighten up all the areas from where a trace passes can be possible i.e. Deploying guards. This is similar to kind of care one will take for his or her belongings or property. The same is very true for Data. In computers, Anti Viruses is proven to be such guards that can take care the trace passes of Virus.

It isn’t always recommended to install Anti Virus on a dedicated SQL Server machine, however, it is not a rule or compulsion that one can’t. But it is imperative that one knows the implication of what can happen in case an Anti Virus is present. In most of the cases, when anti-virus scan is kicked off, it would like to access the database files (MDF, LDF, binary or dll etc.) that are already in use by SQL Server software. And, then, it is the clash, sometimes, it can cause a corruption to the SQL Server files. That is the reason, it is not always recommended.

Best Practices for Anti Virus on SQL Server

  • Exclude database files (MDF, LDF, and NDF)
  • Exclude the binaries / executable files (sqlservr.exe, SSAS, SSRS, SSIS etc.)
  • Exclude the library files
  • Backup files (full, differential or log )
  • Audit and trace files
  • Full-Text Catalog
  • Analysis, Reporting or Integration Services files
  • File Stream

I assume you have enjoyed reading it so far. It may interest you to browse through the configuration category and explore few more tips.

 

photo credit: Michael VH Bugs via photopin (license)

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